Star Wars for the Uninitiated

In a galaxy far, far away, there are still people who are unaware of The Force. I know it’s hard to believe but I’ve met a few who don’t understand what’s so good about ‘Star Wars’. For friends of these uninitiated few, here are the three most important things they must know about the series:

The Force
“May the Force be with you” sometimes sounds like a religious benediction. However, The Force really is the omnipotent power in the Star Wars galaxy. According to Obi-Wan, it’s the energy field that binds the galaxy and all living things together.

Image source: Starwars.com
Image source: Starwars.com

Jedis and Siths
Basically, Jedis are the peacekeeping warriors who learned how to fight using the good side of The Force while the Siths are those from the dark side. The Jedis are the good guys while the Siths are the baddies. Not so difficult, right?

The timeline
This epic movie boasts a long timeline beginning from the first movie that came out during the 70’s. With three movies each from the first three installments to the prequel trilogy, beginners might not know where to start. To prevent your friends from being thrown off guard with old-school effects, perhaps it would be good to start with ‘The Phantom Menace’ (1999). This installment is officially the start of the timeline.

 

Image source: Starwars.com
Image source: Starwars.com

 

The ‘Star Wars’ universe has a lot more to offer. If Yoda were to speak with these newbies, he’ll say, “Watch all movies, you must.”

Hello! David Berkowitz here. I am a production designer for an independent film production company in Los Angeles, California. This job has been one of my wildest dreams since childhood. I’m also a fan of the Jordan-era Chicago Bulls. If you share my interests, follow me on Twitter.

The Daily Grind: My Life as a Production Designer

People assume that when you work for the film and TV industry, you’re either an actor, a director, or an assistant. I currently work as a production designer–and being one is no easy task.

Image source: filmmakeriq.com

Being a production designer means working for the art department. Together with other production designers and consultants, I help in conceptualizing a film, TV, or theater production.

My role at a certain project starts during pre-production. I meet with directors, director of photography, and scriptwriters to create a strategic visual backdrop for each scene. After this has been established, production designers will go into research and design. How does a salon in the 1950s look like? What were fashion trends during the Motown era? These details are important to make a set believable. After we’re done with the research, we come up with a stage or set plan for the art department. The rest of the art department will materialize this vision that we came up with.

As a production designer, I work long hours. There’s no such thing as a 9-to-5 shift. I also travel a lot, if the script or if the design I made requires me to. Most production designers have finished a degree in architecture, technical theater arts, fine arts, or interior design.

Do you think you have what it takes to be a production designer? The work may be tough, but it’s all worth it.

Image source: freshtvinc.com

David Berkowitz here, a Chicago Bulls fan and production designer for indie films. Know more about my love for basketball and filmmaking when you follow me on Twitter.