The most important Wes Anderson movies to date

Wes Anderson is one of the quirkiest, most eccentric directors in recent memory. He has produced films of exquisite cinematic beauty peopled with imperfect, broken, and confused creatures. On the surface, the almost obsessive visual symmetry that his movies are known for and the distinct, unmistakably Andersonian palette seem to jar the senses when coupled with his incongruous characters. In the end, the marriage makes perfect sense. The imagination soars in Anderson’s world, and no one is prevented from reaching that realization. Here are some of the most important Wes Anderson films:

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Image source: flickr.com

The Grand Budapest Hotel

This movie is one of the finest examples of the consistency of Anderson’s cinematic vision, featuring a lot of his visual structure but also big on the emotional and psychological landscape of his filmic style. It might look it was just about a concierge trying to prove he wasn’t a murderer, but this comedy mystery is a poignant film about nostalgia, beauty, and loss.

Moonrise Kingdom

Moonrise Kingdom tells the story of two kids who ran away from home without accounting for the fact that they live on an island. The story presents so many layers that go beyond the fact that it is really a love story. The coming-of-age genre can be abused on so many levels, but this one is surely one of the best stories about children realizing the ways of the world.

Fantastic Mr. Fox

This stop-motion film is arguably the most human of all his works, and that says a lot because it is practically populated by anthropomorphic creatures. The excellent animation is, of course, just the outer layer of this brilliant exploration of acceptance and love.

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Image source: commons.wikimedia.org

Hi! I’m David Berkowitz. I am a production designer for an independent film production company specializing in horror and light fantasy films. Growing up in Chicago, I’ve always been interested in knowing how the magic in the big screen is actually made in the studio. To learn more about the movies I love, follow me on Facebook.

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